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Score! Create Content that Gets a Cheer from Global Sports Fans

Score! Create Content that Gets a Cheer from Global Sports Fans

Colleen Dempsey, Business Development Specialist

Sports are so much more than competing now. They involve cultivating and capturing a fan base, branding, marketing and creating a memorable game day experience. And sports are now more globally inclusive than ever. Case in point: more than 17,000 international athletes are competing and studying at NCAA institutions.  And with international competitions like the World Cup and Olympics growing in reach and audience, thanks to digital streaming and the advent of niche sports networks, sports fans from across the globe now have access to professional athletes competing out of their native country. To cater to a new and growing base of fans, sports organizations are producing more content to engage with fans directly on social media, such as videos and graphics. Did you know the best way to engage your fan base is by making sure content has been translated by a native speaker and localized? It’s not as simple as word for word translation as some phrases and ideas do not translate culturally.

Here are 3 tips from the LinguaLinx language experts to help you stay on your game when it comes to sports translation. Post-game communication: On-field interviews and press conferences are not planned. People often ask: Why do some international athletes competing in the United States, who can speak English in less formal settings, still use interpreters in these settings? The answer is simple: They want to understand and be understood without worrying that something could get lost in translation. Make interpreters readily available and outsource to language experts any written Q&A interviews with your athletes to ensure they stay on message and communicate their answers clearly and in the right context. International recruitment: For college departments that take pride in recruiting international students, it’s important to make recruiting materials available in multiple languages. Even if the student-athlete is fluent in English, the gesture goes a long way, and it could be helpful for guardians who are trying to help with the college search process. Sporting events: If you are hosting a sporting event such as tournament that will feature international teams, make sure your signage and reference materials are properly translated. Machine translations do not take context into account and your materials will sound inauthentic and could make you sound uneducated. To be truly inclusive, you have to speak in a language that crosses all borders and unites in a common theme that all participating athletes can make a connection with and easily understand. For help creating winning sports translations, our experts can help you get your game on!

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The Great Outdoors: How Language Can Take the Apparel and Outdoor Gear Industry to New Peaks of Success

The Great Outdoors: How Language Can Take the Apparel and Outdoor Gear Industry to New Peaks of Success

Nicole Piazza, Sales Coordinator Nicole helps the LinguaLinx sales team ensure clients have the best experience when choosing LinguaLinx translation services. Nicole is a photography aficionado and art museums are some of her favorite places to go. She has a passion for animals and loves spending time with them, especially her Bichon Poodle mix, Cappuccino.

The world is more global than ever. And when you’re brand marketing to the world you need to sound like it and act like it. Many times brands don’t give how their messages will translate in other cultures enough thought to ensure the tone, voice of the brand stays on target in any market. This is where a linguist service that goes beyond word-for-word translation can play a critical role in a company’s marketing success.

This is especially true in the apparel and outdoor gear industry. It’s not a one size fits all approach to translating content. You need native speakers from the regions you are targeting to assist in the creation of content that is going to resonate in that culture and represent the brand you’ve so carefully built. Language experts who can interpret content and have the skills to adapt it without losing its essence are worth their weight in gold. When choosing a translation service partner to work with, it’s important to look for services that go beyond straight translation. They need the capabilities (localization (convey meaning in a culturally-aware manner), global marketing strategy expertise, copywriting skills, marketing translation that stays on brand—both voice and tone) to deliver content and a brand narrative that will resonate with your target audiences. And it’s not just your tagline that needs to appeal to a global audience. It’s all the key elements of your brand: marketing and advertising (print, digital) campaigns, web presence and apps, labels and packaging, merchandise instructions, training materials for your global workforce, etc.). To be successful and stand out on a competitive global playing field, it’s critical to show your brand’s global consciousness (how you do good for the communities in the regions you have a brand presence), acceptance of diversity and understanding and respect for cultural norms. Taking a holistic view of how to carefully and consciously expand your brand across the world with the help of a translation service partner that can build your presence effectively and in keeping with your goals can positively impact your bottom line and create a customer experience that translates for all the right reasons. At LinguaLinx, we have the skilled linguists and in-depth localization expertise you need to translate your brand appeal in any language. Please contact us to learn more.

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Getting Schooled in ISO 17100 Compliance

Getting Schooled in ISO 17100 Compliance

Todd Green, Communications Manager

It’s September and back to school is in full swing in the Northeast. So in that spirit, we want you to get your #2 pencils ready and take notes on today’s lesson about the importance of ISO 17100 compliance. At LinguaLinx, we pride ourselves on our commitment to providing our clients with high-quality translation services. So we follow the rules and hold our work to the highest certifications and standards, including ISO 17100. But before we get to how we do this, first here’s a little history lesson.

What is ISO 17100? In 2015, the International Organization for Standardization’s Technical Committee (ISO/TC 37) adopted ISO 17100: This standard specifies requirements for all aspects of the translation process directly affecting the quality and delivery of translation services. It includes provisions for translation service providers (that’s us!) concerning the management of core processes, minimum qualification requirements, the availability and management of resources and other actions necessary for the delivery of a quality translation service. This includes applicable specifications that might be set by our clients, our own determined set of specifications (yes, we have a process for this) and any other relevant legislation, industry codes or best-practice guides as necessary. How do we make sure we’re following ISO 17100 guidelines? We use Plunet, an industry-leading project management software, for ISO 17100 purposes.  We selected Plunet because it enables us to ensure full ISO 17100 compliance for projects and services such as translation, revision and final verification and release, which are validated by confirming conformance to corresponding work instructions and checklists. With Plunet, we’re able to verify our compliance quickly and easily and keep the process efficient for our clients. Our use of this technology sets us apart from other translation service providers because it assures we follow strict workflows to meet ISO 17100 guidelines for all of our projects. Here’s how Plunet helps us to achieve ISO 17100 compliance: We have automated and standardized processing of requests so there’s no room for errors We’re able to ensure adherence to contractual terms and our clients’ specifications via workflows Gives us the ability to create quotes, orders, projects and tasks and designate projects as ISO 17100 compliant Helps us provide state-of-the-art security of our clients’ information Provides visibility into the entire translation process from start to finish Enhances our collaboration with clients via client review and feedback functionality We want to make sure the translation services we provide are high quality each and every time while adhering to industry standards, certifications and best practices. With Plunet we are providing our clients with an extra level of quality assurance and are always confident we have achieved 100% ISO 17100 compliance. And that is how we stay ahead of the class! For more information about Plunet’s offerings, please visit here.

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Don’t Get Lost in Translation: 4 Digital Marketing Tips

Don’t Get Lost in Translation: 4 Digital Marketing Tips

Nicole Piazza, Sales CoordinatorNicole helps the LinguaLinx sales team ensure clients have the best experience when choosing LinguaLinx translation services. Nicole is a photography aficionado and art museums are some of her favorite places to go. She has a passion for animals and loves spending time with them, especially her Bichon Poodle mix, Cappuccino.

Every savvy marketer knows digital marketing is essential in today’s always-on world. To successfully execute digital marketing campaigns in other global markets, it’s important to keep in mind that you can’t just cut/paste your campaign content and expect it to be effective. A thoughtful, well-researched approach along with the support of a translation services partner can ensure your campaign is localized for maximum success.

Here are 4 tips to make the most of your campaign efforts: 1. Choose the Marketing Mix Wisely: Different markets require a unique marketing mix. It’s not one size fits all. How your potential customers receive their media and information may be completely different in each location. For example, social might work best in one region while digital ads on popular sites are better in another region. It’s important to extensively research new markets before expanding into them to ensure the most potential for success. 2. Words Matter: When it comes to email marketing, pay attention to the content and subject lines to avoid ending up in Spam folders or worse offending your target prospects with language or product names that represent something negative in their culture. Avoid the use of idioms which are used in U.S. marketing, but typically don’t translate to other global markets and aggressive tone or overly salesy language could backfire in other locations. It’s truly not enough to push your email through Google translation and call it a day. You risk your brand reputation and lose the opportunity to build a valuable channel to market your products and services globally. 3. There is No One and Done: Localizing and translation of your campaign content is an ongoing, interactive process. Digital marketing campaigns are living, breathing things and require you to provide regular updates, posts and responses. Frequency and fresh updated content can help extend and maintain your reach. 4. Consistency Can Make the Difference: Working with the same translation service partner throughout your global campaign can help you build campaign elements that will resonate in any market you target and align your message and tone with your overall brand message to remain consistent no matter the location. According to research by Common Sense Advisory, 75% of customers prefer to buy products in their native language.  That’s all the more reason to make the investment of time and resources to localize your messages and translate your campaigns using a well-respected translation services partner like LinguaLinx. We can help you create a global digital marketing campaign that doesn’t get lost in translation.

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Why is Québécois French different from Parisian French?

Why is Québécois French different from Parisian French?

Kristen Bradley

If you’re translating content to reach a French-speaking audience, it’s important to consider not just the language itself, but the nuances that arise based on where your audience lives. A great example of this scenario is the differences between the way French is spoken in France vs Canada.

Québécois (someone from Québec) and Français (someone from France) share the same basic grammatical rules, so if someone from Canada and someone from France were both to write the same letter, the letter would read exactly the same due to both of them using standard French in writing. However due to the history of Québec, spoken French there is quite different from the French spoken in France. Québécois French is based on the French spoken in Paris during the 17th and 18th centuries because during that time Europeans were colonizing the Americas and French royals sent Parisians to live in “la Nouvelle France” (aka New France which is modern-day Québec). But, after this initial colonization, the area became increasingly isolated from France which led to a lot of their linguistics becoming frozen in time as their language was not evolving along with their Parisian counterparts. This resulted in modern-day “Canadian French” holding many linguistic characteristics that are not shared by modern European Francophones.

Accent and Pronunciation Due to the archaic nature of the language, Canadian French contains several 17th century pronunciations, resulting in a noticeably different accent than other Francophones (French speakers). The Québécois accent is known in the Francophone community to be “chantant” (sing-songy) when compared to other French accents. However there is no standard “Québec accent” because every city and town will have its own distinct differences in pronunciation and phrasing as is the case with any language. In Québec, vowels are a bit more nasal-y than in France, for example “an” is pronounced more like “in” so a phrase like “les parents” (parents) may sound more like “les parrains” (grandparents) which could cause some miscommunications. Another difference in pronunciation concerns consonants. Some consonants, like T and D, are “affriquées” meaning when they come before a vowel a Québécois francophone would add an S or Z sound after them. For example, one would pronounce “fatigué” (tired) as “fatsigué” or “Mardi” (Tuesday) as “Mardzi”. Another difference in Québécois pronunciation is their pronunciation of “Un” (the). In Québec, “un” is still pronounced which is not the case in France. Most French speakers will pronounce “un” as “in”. In a similar situation “A” is sometime pronounced “ô”, so “l’art” (art) may end up sounding like “l’or” (gold). Prepositions and Pronouns Concerning pronouns, Québécois vary greatly from other French. Canadians prefer to use the informal form while addressing someone whenever possible. In Québec “tu” (you) is more likely to be used than “vous” (formal form of you) with the only exceptions being when speaking to someone you don’t know or when in a very formal setting. Canadians will almost always use “on” (we) where someone from France would use “nous” (we). Québécois tend to replace “il” (him or it) with “Y”. For example, “Y’est malade” would be used instead of “Il est malade” (He is sick), or “Y fait bon” may be used instead of “Il fait bon” (it’s nice outside). Similarly, “elle” (she or it) is replaced with “A”. For example “A mal au ventre.” (She has a stomach ache) would be used in place of “Elle est mal au ventre”. When referring to themselves, Canadians replace “Je suis” (I am) with a “Chu”. So instead of hearing “Je suis fatigué” (I’m tired) you may hear a Québécois say “Chu fatigué”. When it comes to prepositions, Canadians prefer to keep it short and sweet by shortening prepositional phrases. “Sur la” (on the) turns into “s’a”, “sur les” (on the) becomes “s’es”, “dans les” (in the) becomes “dins” and so on. Language Influence Another difference between Parisian French and “Canadian French” is the impact of First Nation languages on Québécois vocabulary. Québécois use many Aboriginal loanwords, for example, when talking about sandals someone from France would refer to “les sandales” whereas someone from Québec would refer to “les babiches”. The use of French sounding words over Anglicized words is promoted in Canada, however the proximity of English speakers has also caused a lasting influence on the language. It wouldn’t be strange to hear a Québécois conjugate English verbs into French sentences, which is very uncommon for other Francophones outside of Québec. For example you might hear a Québécois say “J’ai plugé mon cellulaire” (I plugged in my cellphone), or “On a crossé la street.” (We crossed the street.). Vocabulary Québec has a specific regional vocabulary that differs from that of France. This is partly due to their isolation from the evolution of the French language that occurred centuries ago. But it is also an effect of their attempts to preserve the French language intentionally by creating new French-sounding words, and trying to Anglicize them as little as possible. For example, “Parking” in France is “Parking” but in Québec it has been changed to “Stationnement”. In France, “faire du shopping” means to go shopping, but in Québec it is changed to “magasiner” (derived from the French “magasin” meaning store). As mentioned before, due to the prevalence of the English language, many English words have been absorbed by the Québécois. For example in France when talking about a car one would refer to “une voiture”, but in Canada one would refer to “un char”. When speaking about a cell phone, in France one would refer to “un portable”, but in Canada one would refer to “un cellulaire”. A job in France would be referred to as “le boulot”, but in Canada one may simply refer to “la job”. A major point of confusion could arise when speaking about meal times between a Québécois and a Français due to the differences in meaning but similarity of words. In Québec breakfast is “le déjeuner”, lunch is “le dîner” and dinner is “le souper”. However, in France breakfast is “le petit-déjeuner”, lunch is “le déjeuner”, and dinner is “le dîner”. Differences like these could cause a bit of confusion between French speakers, or someone traveling to a Francophone country who may not be familiar with regional specifics so it is always wise to brush up on local phrasing while traveling. All of these subtle distinctions must be taken into account when creating or translating any materials for French speakers. Even though there are a great deal of similarities between written content, there are certainly cultural colloquiums which may be more appropriate in content for an audience in Quebec than one in Paris. In terms of audio dubbing to website localization these considerations become even more significant. If you are translating or localizing content for Quebec, check in with a translation professional to make sure you can capture the true voice of the Québécois.

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A Profile on Scandinavian Languages: Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish

A Profile on Scandinavian Languages: Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish

Kristen Bradley

Scandinavia is the title given to the Northern European region where Denmark, Norway, and Sweden are located. Three languages spoken in this region are Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish. Did you know that these three languages are mutually intelligible? This means that speakers of each of these languages can understand one another with little difficulty. Let’s take a look at the three Scandinavian languages.

Danish Danish is an Indo-European language descended from North Germanic and East Norse. It is spoken by approximately six million people worldwide, predominantly in the country of Denmark. While there is no law declaring an official language for Denmark, the Code of Civil Procedure does claim Danish as the language of the courts. The English and Danish verb systems are very similar and share many features. Danish verbs are conjugated according to tense, but do not change according to person or number. Danish nouns have only two genders, common and neuter. A noun’s gender is not necessarily predictable and in most cases must be memorized. Danish words are mostly derived from Old Norse Language with new words created through compounding. An extreme example of compounding is the word kvindehåndboldlandsholdet, which means “the female handball national team.” There have been many world-renowned authors from Denmark. A notable example is Hans Christian Andersen, a popular and prolific author of fairy tales. Norwegian Norwegian (Norsk) is a West Scandinavian language descended from North Germanic through Germanic and the Indo-European language family. Norwegian is spoken primarily in Norway where it holds official language status. Norway is not a member of the European Union. Norway encompasses 149,000 sq. mi. and has a native population of about 5 million. As such, it is the second least densely populated country in Europe. An officially sanctioned standard for spoken Norwegian does not exist, and most Norwegians speak their own dialect. There are two official versions of written Norwegian: Bokmål (“book tongue”) and Nynorsk (“new Norwegian”). Both versions are regulated by the Norwegian Language Council. Norwegian is from the same Germanic language family as is English. Thanks to this relationship, there are several similarities between the two languages. However, there are also some significant differences that should be learned and watched out for in both written and oral Norwegian. A greater number of English words have continuously made their way into the Norwegian lexicon, most notably after World War II. Most of these words have come from movies, entertainment, music, technology, and books. However, the influence that Norwegian had over English during the Viking Age is still greater than modern English’s impact on Norwegian. Swedish Standard Swedish originates from the region around Sweden’s capital, Stockholm, and is spoken by virtually all Swedes. While Swedish is the official language of Sweden, it also has the distinction of being one of the official languages of the European Union. Swedish and English share a similar phonological system. However, Swedish has 17 more pure vowel sounds than English. Despite having a larger range of vowel sounds, Swedish speakers still have trouble pronouncing words starting with “sh-”, “be-” and “ba-“. Swedish has 18 consonant phonemes, which overlap those for English. Swedish speakers often have trouble with English “th-” words. When it comes to vocabulary, English shares many similar cognates. However, some words that may be plural in English are singular in Swedish and vice versa. Other things to watch out for when translating the two languages are the possibility that Swedish punctuation patterns may negatively transfer, and there is an expectation of run-on sentences. The New Testament in Swedish was published in 1526 followed by the full Bible translation in 1541.

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